Page 3 of 179 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 25 to 36 of 2139
  1. #25

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Brilliant stuff guys. As generic a comment it comes off as, this has so far reinforced the belief that confidence might be the biggest thing Boykin could use in his game; piggybacking off of Ed's comments, it seems like there are some plays where Boykin could either A.) Fight for the ball more, or B.) is focusing too much on making the catch, and actually making the play more difficult than it needs to be. And, of course, it would follow that if Boykin did exhibit more confidence fighting for balls, that Lamar and the offense would trust him more and send him more targets, leading to more confidence and rhythm.

    As an aside, that's the thing about confidence. It is easiest to be confident when you are producing (in any field of life; with women, with your job, etc) or performing strongly, but if you were already doing well, your confidence (probably) wouldn't be a problem. Agh, human nature, right?





  2. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin


    #9: Game6 @Bengals, Q1 6:43, 1st-&-15 CIN 30
    Lamar complete short middle to Boykin for 18 yards (tackle by William Jackson and Dre Kirkpatrick)


    One of his better routes.

    Route: Slant
    Win/Separation: Won at the Line (+). Completely turns the CB around gains about 4 yards of separation on a slant!
    Ball Location: Diagonal lead. On target in stride.
    Catch: Clean, pluck with hands
    Play Result/Design: X-Iso Slant
    Last edited by edromeo; 06-20-2020 at 04:28 PM.
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





  3. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    #10: Game6 @Bengals, Q2 10:35, 1st-&-10 RAV 8
    Lamar complete short right to Boykin for 10 yards (tackle by Jessie Bates)


    Route: Over/Crosser
    Win/Separation: 1-2 yards of separation vs off-man
    Ball Location: Horizontal lead. On target in stride.
    Catch: Clean, pluck with hands
    Play Result/Design: Play-action, bootleg


    ….I'm no expert, but Lamar doesn't seem to be in a big hurry to hit Boykin on this play. When Lamar finishes the play fake and turns to scan the field and roll right, Boykin is between the hashes with maybe two steps on the trail defender. Snead has taken the far corner deep, and the single high safety is 12 yds off Boykin. Lamar seems to take another 4-5 steps, and by the time Boykin actually gets the ball he's outside the numbers. Timing looks odd to me.

    Now it is true that in 2019 Lamar was one of the few QBs whose numbers were less efficient WITH play-action than without. Maybe he's not used to it, and it takes him longer to re-acquire than it takes other QBs, I dunno.
    Lamar throws on time and on rhythm in my estimation. Remember its not just play-action its play-action with a bootleg. One of the reasons why coaches call bootleg passes is to give the QB a chance to run. My guess at the progression would be: (1) Snead - Wheel route/Clear (2) Boykin - Over (3) Hurst -Delay-Flat (1a) Alert -QB run (1b) Ingram - Backside swing
    Last edited by edromeo; 06-20-2020 at 04:28 PM.
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





  4. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    #13: Game7 @Seattle, Q1 13:13, 2nd-&-5 RAV 36
    Lamar complete deep right to Boykin for 50 yards (tackle by Tedric Thompson)

    Route: Go
    Win/Separation: Blown coverage
    Ball Location: Underthrown vertical lead.
    Catch: Good adjustment to underthrow
    Play Result/Design: X-Iso Go

    This ball is underthrown, don't you think? A Flacco to Torrey Smith special. If it's a little out in front of Boykin, it's a TD. But maybe we can't complain about Lamar factoring in a little slowing by Boykin.
    Lamar under throws this ball, needed to get more on this. Don't think it was a purposeful underthrow by any means.
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





  5. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin


    #17: Game11 @Rams, Q3 2:18, 4th-&-4 RAM 33
    Lamar complete short right to Boykin for 15 yards (tackle by Jalen Ramsey)


    Route: Curl
    Win/Separation: Settle in zone
    Ball Location: On target
    Catch: Hands pluck
    Play Result/Design: Sprint out-Dash (R)

    Good to see the staff call this play and Lamar target him. All though it wasn't a critical play, it suggest to me that Boykin's development is on their mind. An opportunity for a confidence builder.
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





  6. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by Julius486 View Post
    Brilliant stuff guys. As generic a comment it comes off as, this has so far reinforced the belief that confidence might be the biggest thing Boykin could use in his game; piggybacking off of Ed's comments, it seems like there are some plays where Boykin could either A.) Fight for the ball more, or B.) is focusing too much on making the catch, and actually making the play more difficult than it needs to be. And, of course, it would follow that if Boykin did exhibit more confidence fighting for balls, that Lamar and the offense would trust him more and send him more targets, leading to more confidence and rhythm.

    As an aside, that's the thing about confidence. It is easiest to be confident when you are producing (in any field of life; with women, with your job, etc) or performing strongly, but if you were already doing well, your confidence (probably) wouldn't be a problem. Agh, human nature, right?
    Ty, likewise. Agreed on the possible confidence role, well said.

    I also think Boykin needs to sharpen up his route running:
    o mastering his keys/reads on drag routes

    o vertical game
    -stacking the DB on vertical routes after he wins at the LOS
    -stacking and bumping to gain separation near the catch point
    -being more aggressive and being 1st to attack and high point the ball

    o accelerating out of his breaks
    o being aggressive to work his himself to the ball and get in the best catch positions

    IF he works his tail off there are no physical limitations preventing his improvement in these areas.
    An apartment near Pompano Beach can't cost that much either.
    Last edited by edromeo; 06-20-2020 at 06:04 PM.
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





  7. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Balt-Wash corridor
    Posts
    20,753

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by edromeo View Post
    Route: Slant
    Win/Separation: Won at the Line (+). Completely turns the CB around gains about 4 yards of separation on a slant!
    Ball Location: Diagonal lead. On target in stride.
    Catch: Clean, pluck with hands
    Play Result/Design: X-Iso Slant
    Quote Originally Posted by edromeo View Post
    Route: Over/Crosser
    Win/Separation: 1-2 yards of separation vs off-man
    Ball Location: Horizontal lead. On target in stride.
    Catch: Clean, pluck with hands
    Play Result/Design: Play-action, bootleg
    I appreciate seeing the structure & formality of these. I'm learning a lot as I read them; the categorizations, etc.


    Question: Do you have a "neutral" rating for separation on some plays? Neither plus nor minus? I'm gathering "yes". The way I read this, in the second play above (the over/crosser) you're assigning a neutral "grade" in the win/separation area. Boykin does what he's supposed to do, unremarkably. Whereas in the first play you're assigning a plus for putting a pretty good player into the spin cycle. And in that crosser from a few posts ago
    (you know: the one that wasn't dropped )
    you're assigning a minus for slowing on the drag? So overall a player can get a plus, a neutral, or a minus in that area on any given play?





  8. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by JimZipCode View Post
    I appreciate seeing the structure & formality of these. I'm learning a lot as I read them; the categorizations, etc.


    Question: Do you have a "neutral" rating for separation on some plays? Neither plus nor minus? I'm gathering "yes". The way I read this, in the second play above (the over/crosser) you're assigning a neutral "grade" in the win/separation area. Boykin does what he's supposed to do, unremarkably. Whereas in the first play you're assigning a plus for putting a pretty good player into the spin cycle. And in that crosser from a few posts ago
    (you know: the one that wasn't dropped )
    you're assigning a minus for slowing on the drag? So overall a player can get a plus, a neutral, or a minus in that area on any given play?
    Ty, I think its important and useful to have/follow a standard rubric for scouting/grading it makes assessment of skills quantifiable and eases comparisons and imho makes them more accurate. I think I posted my rubric for QBs somewhere in the forum and posted my rubric in the WR thread amidst much joyous agreement ;) from some of the regulars.

    But yeah, I follow a standard +/- format: -,0,+,++
    I didn't post a +/- on every play because I was kinda rushing but yeah there are def neutral grades. If the receiver is schemed open without any effort or takes advantage of yards that are given by the defense they don't automatically get a + they get a 0=n/a
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





  9. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Balt-Wash corridor
    Posts
    20,753

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by edromeo View Post
    Good to see the staff call this play and Lamar target him. All though it wasn't a critical play, it suggest to me that Boykin's development is on their mind. An opportunity for a confidence builder.
    Yes. But: if developing Boykin were really a priority, they could have run this play in the first half, rather than waiting til 2 mins remaining in the 3rd Q.

    Their usage of Boykin was a little weird. It would almost make more sense if he were another TE: like Nick Boyle is the starter at run-blocking TE, but second-string at receiving TE. Boykin is a starter: but the position he started at was "run-blocking WR". He would get involved as a pass-catching WR when the game is already in-hand; he's second-string at the "pass-catching WR" position.

    Y'know what I mean? Feels unusual.

    I'm a little critical of it because Boykin is mah boi. But I want to emphasize, I'm not really that critical of it. The Ravens had a whole lot of fish to fry on offense last season. Developing Lamar was job one, job two, and job three. New playbook. Score points, control the ball and win games. Develop the 1st-round WR. Then later, protect & manage the 1st-rounder when the injury flared up. "Developing Boykin" would have been a useful thing to accomplish also; but it was a lower priority that those other items, and it should have been. They prioritized appropriately.





  10. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Balt-Wash corridor
    Posts
    20,753

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by edromeo View Post
    But yeah, I follow a standard +/- format: -,0,+,++
    The ++ would be pretty rare, I take it?





  11. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by JimZipCode View Post
    Yes. But: if developing Boykin were really a priority, they could have run this play in the first half, rather than waiting til 2 mins remaining in the 3rd Q.....

    I'm a little critical of it because Boykin is mah boi. But I want to emphasize, I'm not really that critical of it. The Ravens had a whole lot of fish to fry on offense last season. Developing Lamar was job one, job two, and job three. New playbook. Score points, control the ball and win games. Develop the 1st-round WR. Then later, protect & manage the 1st-rounder when the injury flared up. "Developing Boykin" would have been a useful thing to accomplish also; but it was a lower priority that those other items, and it should have been. They prioritized appropriately.
    I agree with the conclusion you arrived at. In the early part of your post i think you jumped to wrong conclusion from my previous post. I didn't mean to imply that developing Boykin was priority. I don't think his development as receiver was a priority at all and nor should it have been. Roman's mandate is to field the best offense he can in the most efficient and explosive way possible....everything else comes after that first prime directive.

    Calling that 4th down play for Boykin lets me know they haven't forgotten about Boykin him.

    IF the offense needed more production from Boykin to function I think they could have developed him faster by funneling volume targets his way and they would just have to live with the early ups and downs of his production as he developed. For example...if Andrews, Roberts, Hollywood and Snead were hurt (lol) then Boykins would have been received a steady stream of targets regardless of his efficiency with those targets but it would have made him a better player in the long run.

    IF Boykin didn't require development i.e. time to polish his game then he would have been drafted higher.
    But due to the fact that the organization will have to develop him he represents a bargain.
    Imagine IF Boykin reaches his full potential?

    The reasons I ̶a̶m̶ was optimistic about Boykin's development this season is because i am buying into Harbaughs emphasis on attacking 1-on-1 match-ups downfield. That improvement would require emphasis = time in practice...Roman would have to dial up more vertical shots, Lamar's/Griffin's would throw more vertical shots in practice and knowing their work ethic they would be working on it after practice also.

    Now, i'm just worried about there being a season. :(


    Side note.....looking at the accuracy of the service Boykin received on the slant passes from Lamar vs Griffin. Lamarís accuracy led to a completion and Griffin throwing behind led to an incompletion

    I think Tyler Huntley's accuracy is gonna be eye opening throwing next to Griffin and Trace.
    Last edited by edromeo; 06-20-2020 at 08:05 PM.





  12. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    8,344
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: A closer look at Miles Boykin

    Quote Originally Posted by JimZipCode View Post
    The ++ would be pretty rare, I take it?
    Yup...
    ++
    "Those corners...and those safeties are going to be one-on-one... and we got to make them pay for it,"





Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Link To Mobile Site