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  1. #1
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    The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    There's something I've never fully understood about this dynamic. When it comes to the money, many fans act as though the player isn't a person. The player is a commodity. The fans take on the mentality of ownership, as if they own the team. Then, we hear a bunch of non-sensical comparisons to how the average fan has to work five times harder at their job, completely ignoring the rigorous training that pro athletes endure, while the average Freddy Fat Ass, sits at home eating cheesesteaks after work and wondering why he has to pay all of this money for meds for a high blood pressure. Most of them won't even run ten miles in a year, let alone a day.

    However, when it comes to something we can actually relate to: "Being forced back to work before you're ready", the comparison that makes sense, those same fans don't want to hear it. You'd think we'd be rooting on someone who actually has the power to tell their employer to go shove it until they're healthy. And what's worse is that these guys actually do want to get back to playing.

    These are still people. Money doesn't change that. Yes, it makes them more comfortable from a bill standpoint and a 'how will I provide for my family' standpoint. FAR more comfortable. But that doesn't make every problem they have go away. They're still people. What if one of these players were your son or daughter? You encourage them to stand firm and get the best deal at their jobs and do what's best for them, but once they become athletes, they should just shut up and be thankful and take a million when they're worth ten? Play through any and every injury? That just reeks of petty self-pity and envy.

    Kawhi Leonard busted his ass to go from being a mid-first round pick (Not that great in the NBA), to one of the best players in the league, and a Finals MVP. Yet and still, the organization in San Antonio tries to pressure him and shame him into playing before he feels ready. Leaking information to the media. Even sending teammates to publicly criticize him and feeding them biased information about his injury.

    Not even two years later, Kevin Durant hurts his leg and many sense that it's more serious than a calf strain. Still, some in the organization feel that a man who is so passionate about the sport, isn't doing all that he can to get back as soon as possible. One day, he can't even practice. They go down 1-3 and suddenly, he's in the starting lineup. Who in the hell made that call that he could play. No one in their right mind felt he could play. That had to be one of the worst-feeling predictions I've ever made, about what would happen. I'm not happy about that shit, but I mean, you could just see it coming. And why? Because the organization pumps out information that gets people (Players, fans, medical staff) to put pressure on Durant to prove himself or whatever. Now, he's probably gone for at least 80% of the next season and nobody's going to have jackshit to say to him about it. Just, 'Oh well'. And then we even see a bunch of crocodile tears on the podium last night.

    Why? For what? Are fans happy now? One robot out of the way, let's just get another one in there. Yet, people wonder why their lives are filled with misery. It's called Karma.
    "Please take with you this final sword, The Excellector. I am praying that your journey will be guided by the light", Leon Shore





  2. #2

    Re: The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Excellector View Post
    There's something I've never fully understood about this dynamic. When it comes to the money, many fans act as though the player isn't a person. The player is a commodity. The fans take on the mentality of ownership, as if they own the team. Then, we hear a bunch of non-sensical comparisons to how the average fan has to work five times harder at their job, completely ignoring the rigorous training that pro athletes endure, while the average Freddy Fat Ass, sits at home eating cheesesteaks after work and wondering why he has to pay all of this money for meds for a high blood pressure. Most of them won't even run ten miles in a year, let alone a day.

    However, when it comes to something we can actually relate to: "Being forced back to work before you're ready", the comparison that makes sense, those same fans don't want to hear it. You'd think we'd be rooting on someone who actually has the power to tell their employer to go shove it until they're healthy. And what's worse is that these guys actually do want to get back to playing.

    These are still people. Money doesn't change that. Yes, it makes them more comfortable from a bill standpoint and a 'how will I provide for my family' standpoint. FAR more comfortable. But that doesn't make every problem they have go away. They're still people. What if one of these players were your son or daughter? You encourage them to stand firm and get the best deal at their jobs and do what's best for them, but once they become athletes, they should just shut up and be thankful and take a million when they're worth ten? Play through any and every injury? That just reeks of petty self-pity and envy.

    Kawhi Leonard busted his ass to go from being a mid-first round pick (Not that great in the NBA), to one of the best players in the league, and a Finals MVP. Yet and still, the organization in San Antonio tries to pressure him and shame him into playing before he feels ready. Leaking information to the media. Even sending teammates to publicly criticize him and feeding them biased information about his injury.

    Not even two years later, Kevin Durant hurts his leg and many sense that it's more serious than a calf strain. Still, some in the organization feel that a man who is so passionate about the sport, isn't doing all that he can to get back as soon as possible. One day, he can't even practice. They go down 1-3 and suddenly, he's in the starting lineup. Who in the hell made that call that he could play. No one in their right mind felt he could play. That had to be one of the worst-feeling predictions I've ever made, about what would happen. I'm not happy about that shit, but I mean, you could just see it coming. And why? Because the organization pumps out information that gets people (Players, fans, medical staff) to put pressure on Durant to prove himself or whatever. Now, he's probably gone for at least 80% of the next season and nobody's going to have jackshit to say to him about it. Just, 'Oh well'. And then we even see a bunch of crocodile tears on the podium last night.

    Why? For what? Are fans happy now? One robot out of the way, let's just get another one in there. Yet, people wonder why their lives are filled with misery. It's called Karma.
    Interesting. Imagine these guys in 40 years when their bodies are held together by nuts and bolts. Then tell me they are paid too much. What a crock. They deserve every penny they can get because they pay the price for every penny.





  3. #3
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    Re: The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    This was one time where I actually agreed with Boogie Cousins. They are seen as Superstar athletes only. The people in that organization see the daily issues they go through. Relationship issues, family issues, personal demons, injuries. Fans don't see that. They don't want to see that. They don't want to see that these guys are still human. So, when fans see them lash out or do human things, they're villains. Pedophilia? I get it. Woman beating? I get it. However, the things these guys are vilified for is outrageous. They're human.
    "Please take with you this final sword, The Excellector. I am praying that your journey will be guided by the light", Leon Shore





  4. #4
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    Re: The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    Quote Originally Posted by signore View Post
    Interesting. Imagine these guys in 40 years when their bodies are held together by nuts and bolts. Then tell me they are paid too much. What a crock. They deserve every penny they can get because they pay the price for every penny.
    While I don't totally disagree with you, just think of what our sons and daughters will be like in 40 years... and they haven't had the opportunity to make million$ in their youth. Not every ache and pain can be attributed to playing football. There are office workers, wait staff, bus drivers, etc. who end up with disabling diseases too. Sure they deserve every penny they make, but don't ask me to feel sorry for them when they know they're in a highly competitive physical sport. Perhaps you should feel some sympathy for our soldiers, police, and fire fighters before you weep for pro athletes... Bc





  5. #5
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    Re: The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    Quote Originally Posted by BcRaven View Post
    While I don't totally disagree with you, just think of what our sons and daughters will be like in 40 years... and they haven't had the opportunity to make million$ in their youth. Not every ache and pain can be attributed to playing football. There are office workers, wait staff, bus drivers, etc. who end up with disabling diseases too. Sure they deserve every penny they make, but don't ask me to feel sorry for them when they know they're in a highly competitive physical sport. Perhaps you should feel some sympathy for our soldiers, police, and fire fighters before you weep for pro athletes... Bc
    Okay, and who says that I donít Bc? Who says that I donít feel sorry for servicemen? Does that I mean I canít have an
    Understanding of what being human is like, once a person reaches a certain level in their bank account? What are we all working for then? If we hit the lottery, are we going to turn it down or something? Furthermore, are you going to keep this mentality if one of your grandchildren becomes a professional athlete?





  6. #6
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    Question Re: The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Excellector View Post
    Okay, and who says that I don’t Bc? Who says that I don’t feel sorry for servicemen? Does that I mean I can’t have an
    Understanding of what being human is like, once a person reaches a certain level in their bank account? What are we all working for then? If we hit the lottery, are we going to turn it down or something? Furthermore, are you going to keep this mentality if one of your grandchildren becomes a professional athlete?
    Ex, I wasn't replying to you. My reply was to signore (post #2)... Bc
    Last edited by BcRaven; 06-11-2019 at 07:42 PM.





  7. #7

    Re: The nature of the player/organization dynamic in the eyes of fans.

    A lot of fans have an easy time understanding why an athlete makes a decision for purely financial reasons, compared to say David West leaving millions on the table to chase rings, and Ravens fans are predisposed to rooting for guys leaving the Ravens to make as much money as possible for compensatory picks, so as a fan group I’d think we’d fare well on being reasonable about athletes making long term decisions. But had KD sat last night and they’d lost it would have stuck to him for the rest of his life, and we’re talking about the Knicks regular season next year, not actual stakes.





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