Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 234567 LastLast
Results 61 to 72 of 79
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Balmer Merlin Hon
    Posts
    3,338
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...



    Quote Originally Posted by Carey View Post
    Kindle has the physical ability no question, the FO probably see enough in him that they say why not keep working with him in practice, offseason programs, etc. and if he hasnt improved by then he wont make the 53 man roster next season.

    We were talking about this when he got cut, he wasnt really a pass rusher in college, he was a blitzer with athleticism and sideline to sideline upside. I think if he can continue to learn the nuances of pass rushing, get counter moves, etc. and become competent as a ST player best case he could be a sub package rusher. Are the odds extremely against him, sure, but the Ravens obviously see something in practice that make them want to continue to work with him. Also i think if he didnt want to work there is no way he'd be on the practice squad, they would have just cut ties.
    You made the foolish mistake of seeing the thread title & thinking it was actually about Kindle. Clearly you didn't get the memo that it had morphed into a Ray Lewis/John Harbaugh love-hatefest...

    But let's talk Kindle, just you & me, OK?

    It never occurred to me that he had any PS eligibility left, but if it had I would have understood the moves completely. First, there is very little risk he'd be poached off the PS: a reputation as perhaps not the quickest study with respect to the playbook, plus his ongoing hearing problems, would probably warn teams away from signing him to a 53-man roster.

    Second, he's a great fit for the Ravens practice squad. PS is for two types of players: projects & emergency backups. Sergio fits in both senses. There may still be hope for him as a situational LB next season (especially if in the meantime they can work out a hearing fix that the league will allow). And if (dogforbid) they were to lose another LB or need to fill a hole on ST, Sergio has been practicing with the team for over a year & (whatever his limitations might be) knows the roles they might need him to fill better than anyone coming in cold.




  2. #62

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Take a look at the Kindle/Cody/Dickson draft and take note of the players still on the board. Then dream of what could have been.

    http://www.nfl.com/draft/2010/tracke...-round-input:1

    Dunlap at DE

    Lee or Bowman at MLB

    Jimmy Graham at TE.


    Oh well.




  3. #63

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Quote Originally Posted by RavingMad View Post
    Take a look at the Kindle/Cody/Dickson draft and take note of the players still on the board. Then dream of what could have been.

    http://www.nfl.com/draft/2010/tracke...-round-input:1

    Dunlap at DE

    Lee or Bowman at MLB

    Jimmy Graham at TE.


    Oh well.
    Sergio Kindle is still a "what could be."

    Its a matter of our coaching staff giving him a chance to actually play in a football game. Its ridiculous, you CANNOT base a players skill simply off of their practicing. Otherwise, players like Tom Brady, Bart Scott, Priest Holmes or James Harrison would never have seen the football field.




  4. #64

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Quote Originally Posted by landspeed View Post
    Sergio Kindle is still a "what could be."

    Its a matter of our coaching staff giving him a chance to actually play in a football game. Its ridiculous, you CANNOT base a players skill simply off of their practicing. Otherwise, players like Tom Brady, Bart Scott, Priest Holmes or James Harrison would never have seen the football field.
    You have to earn the right to get on the field during the regular season. That's what training camp, preseason and practices are for. So far the only thing Sergio has earned is the privelege of being on the practice squad. He hasn't done enough for the coaches to put him in games. Besides it's a numbers game as well. He's buried on the depth chart.




  5. #65

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Quote Originally Posted by landspeed View Post
    Sergio Kindle is still a "what could be."

    Its a matter of our coaching staff giving him a chance to actually play in a football game. Its ridiculous, you CANNOT base a players skill simply off of their practicing. Otherwise, players like Tom Brady, Bart Scott, Priest Holmes or James Harrison would never have seen the football field.
    What??! Activate a player that is showing little on the practice field at the expense of a player who is. Any coach that rewards a player for underachieving during preparation is in danger of loosing respect from other players on the team. You earn playing time.




  6. #66

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Quote Originally Posted by pslholder96 View Post
    You have to earn the right to get on the field during the regular season. That's what training camp, preseason and practices are for. So far the only thing Sergio has earned is the privelege of being on the practice squad. He hasn't done enough for the coaches to put him in games. Besides it's a numbers game as well. He's buried on the depth chart.
    You beat me to it.




  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The Land of Verdite
    Posts
    12,095
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    As for the intended topic of the thread:

    We all thought that Terrell Suggs injury saved Sergio Kindle's job. However, it also turned out to be what held him back as well. Kindle's best skill is as a pass rusher. However, the team's run defense has been so bad that they've barely been able to get to the point where they can be concerned with rushing the passer. The focus has been on stopping the run. So, Kindle has been on the pine again.

    During the off-season, Suggs' injury seemed to be his only chance of making the team. Now, Suggs and Upshaw's ability to set the edge might be his only chance to get back on the team and see the field in obvious pass rushing situations.

    The reality is that Sergio Kindle, in retrospect, was the Dez Bryant of OLB prospects. However, the Ravens never even got the chance to see the glimpses of his capabilities, because of his poor decisions.
    "When questioned, the Elders explained that they were in search of magical powers. However, they're actually searching for the whereabouts of a certain ring. This ring is a legendary treasure that long ago was known to exist"




  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The Land of Verdite
    Posts
    12,095
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Now, to get back to the direction in which the thread was going:

    Captain Silver, say what you want about him, is 'usually' able to do a good job of calling a spade a spade. His isn't often far off. He simply fears that the organization, in searching for stability, will become complacent in their regular season/moderate playoff success. When you look at some of the decisions they have made, such as retaining Cam Cameron, you can see where he is coming from. The front office is rather risk adverse.

    I don't completely agree with his view of John Harbaugh, in reference to the talent, but his point is that if Billick had drafted Flacco or been given the opportunity to do so, he would have done just as well with the level of talent on this team, or quite possibly won a Super Bowl by now. Now, that's not to say that Billick would have chosen Flacco, because we really don't know, but that's where Captain is coming from.

    I actually also agree with his comments about Belichick. I happen to think that Belichick's audio/visual advantage played a role in enhancing the very development of Tom Brady. Once that advantage was taken away, he did everything in his power to give Brady top notch weaponry for their offensive system. Suddenly, instead of throwing to Caldwell and Brown, Brady was throwing to Moss and Welker. However, I will say that Brady is still pretty darn good now.

    Personally, I don't think that Billick's loss of the locker room was overblown. Rex Ryan admitted in his book that he told Bisciotti that Billick lost the locker room. When your DC is doing that to you, that's bad. Billick's only chance to regain the locker room would have been to develop the offense, which means he would have had to hit on his next QB. He just never got the chance, but that doesn't mean that he would have taken Flacco. He brought much of his trouble on himself for taking Boller and trying to go out of his way to show that he knew QBs.
    "When questioned, the Elders explained that they were in search of magical powers. However, they're actually searching for the whereabouts of a certain ring. This ring is a legendary treasure that long ago was known to exist"




  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The Land of Verdite
    Posts
    12,095
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    I also agree with him about Ray. There is no reason why Ozzie, in all of his drafting skill, couldn't have had better talent set up at ILB for this very situation, except for treating Ray delicately. It's nice and all, but this is the result.
    "When questioned, the Elders explained that they were in search of magical powers. However, they're actually searching for the whereabouts of a certain ring. This ring is a legendary treasure that long ago was known to exist"




  10. #70

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Quote Originally Posted by lobachevsky View Post
    You made the foolish mistake of seeing the thread title & thinking it was actually about Kindle. Clearly you didn't get the memo that it had morphed into a Ray Lewis/John Harbaugh love-hatefest...

    But let's talk Kindle, just you & me, OK?

    It never occurred to me that he had any PS eligibility left, but if it had I would have understood the moves completely. First, there is very little risk he'd be poached off the PS: a reputation as perhaps not the quickest study with respect to the playbook, plus his ongoing hearing problems, would probably warn teams away from signing him to a 53-man roster.

    Second, he's a great fit for the Ravens practice squad. PS is for two types of players: projects & emergency backups. Sergio fits in both senses. There may still be hope for him as a situational LB next season (especially if in the meantime they can work out a hearing fix that the league will allow). And if (dogforbid) they were to lose another LB or need to fill a hole on ST, Sergio has been practicing with the team for over a year & (whatever his limitations might be) knows the roles they might need him to fill better than anyone coming in cold.
    This thread was so unrecognizable i started to think i posted in the wrong one lol...btw i agree with ur this post completely.




  11. #71

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    Quote Originally Posted by Carey View Post
    This thread was so unrecognizable i started to think i posted in the wrong one lol...btw i agree with ur this post completely.
    I get what you are saying about the thread becoming unrecognizable, but I think John is to blame for a lot of why Kindle has or hasn't made it.

    Let's say that in the first game, the slaughter of the Bengals, they stuck Kindle in the 2nd half once the rout was on to see what he could do, that would have really helped make a definitive decision.

    I get Kindle has had a mass of problems and likely has a fork in him. I also get the earning a spot in practice. But there comes a time when a coach can say, "Let's see what he can do, period. I am coach and this is my decision."

    Too often we have young players who never see the field unless someone is injured. Flacco and Smith are two examples of guys who played well because someone went down in front. I feel like players all over the league come out of nowhere and yet we set the table with the same old tarnished knives and forks.




  12. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    448

    Re: Kindle experiment is not over...

    I have a hard time buying into the idea that a partial loss of hearing would affect a defensive player that much. Isn't there a reason that home crowds make lots of noise when their defense is on the field and the opponent's offense is on the field, but stay completely quiet when their offense is on the field?

    Defenses can still bunch up and look at each other in a no huddle for a few seconds, while offenses have to stay set and either glace back or listen to audibles. I think that the hearing loss would be a much bigger deal if he were on offense.




Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Russell Street Report Website Design by D3Corp Ocean City Maryland