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  1. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap



    Quote Originally Posted by purple_city39 View Post
    You're missing a key point in my post that you quoted. MLK and Ghandi were both hated DURING their protests. The same way people seem to have revisionist history in regards to Ali. Also hated DURING his protest.

    For all three, it was in hindsight of their protests that people started to give them the praise they garner until this day. While they protested, they were treated just like Kaepernick by practically everyone their protest didn't directly benefit.

    You can talk about the change they made all you want and that's fine. Government's plotted on their lives while they were alive (sans Ali to my knowledge) and 2 of the 3 lost their lives. THEN people started to realize that their cause was a just one.

    MLK did garner more support from non followers during his protests as time went on........and Kaepernick is also receiving more support as time went on. Hell, in recent weeks he's received verbal support, and even joined in protest, by players that aren't even affected by the issues he's protesting for (ie some white players like Clay Matthews, Aaron Rodgers, Jake Long, etc). Hate him in the moment, like MLK, but he's making progress......like MLK. And no, I'm not putting him on MLK's level as an activist (he's going the route of solo work as opposed to organizing groups, but to be fair there are others doing organization work). Simply pointing out a few similarities
    So what if they were hated by racists and those opposed to Indian independence? I never said they weren't. My point regarding that was that despite having to deal with that hatred, they still made progress. If you think Kap getting support from a few white players is progress...Kap's not even involved anymore, those white players you mentioned are acting on their own. Perhaps they'll be able to stay on point. But kneeling during the anthem carries too many negatives that outweigh the only positive: it gets some people's attention. For awhile, anyway.

    And the government didn't plot on MLK's life (There's also no evidence that the British gave any serious thought to murdering Gandhi either). Face it, if Uncle Sam wants you dead, you're dead, unless you just disappear, which wasn't an option for a public figure like MLK. What the government did do was spy on and try to undermine MLK in various ways, in part because the morons thought he was a communist. I mean the man's a Christian; how's he going to be a Communist, who themselves were atheists, lol.

    And you're underestimating how much White America in the North had changed by 1964, the year the Civil Rights Act was passed. Between fighting alongside African American soldiers during WW II and witnessing their valor firsthand, cheering and rooting for black baseball players who played for their favorite baseball teams (after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier), being fans of black boxing champs like Sugar Ray Robinson & Joe Louis (who famously beat Max Schmeling in their rematch, btw they later became close friends), and most significantly the desegregation of our schools in 1954 which brought white and black children together enabling them to socialize with each other en masse for the first time, all served to humanize blacks in the eyes of many whites. There was still racism up North, yes, but it was eroding, and fairly steadily. Down in the Jim Crow South, on the other hand, the KKK and Dixiecrats were still running strong. The divide between the North and South had grown over these decades, almost as if the Civil Rights movement evolved into a second Civil War of sorts.

    In 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson, who had spearheaded the passage of the Civil Rights Act , taking over for Kennedy after his assassination, was running for re-election. At the time,
    whites made up about 88% of the US population, with blacks only 10 to 11%. Clearly, black support alone wasn't going to get Johnson re-elected. And virtually all the experts, including many in his own Democratic party, believed that Johnson's support for the Civil Rights Act meant he had no hope of winning--that he had committed political suicide.

    Not only did Johnson win, but he did so by a landslide. One of the most lopsided victories in US presidential election history. Moderates may not say much very often or speak loudly when they do, but they certainly let how they vote speak volumes.
    Last edited by PerpetuallyBored74; 09-08-2017 at 08:31 PM.





  2. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by PerpetuallyBored74 View Post
    So what if they were hated by racists and those opposed to Indian independence? I never said they weren't. My point regarding that was that despite having to deal with that hatred, they still made progress. If you think Kap getting support from a few white players is progress...Kap's not even involved anymore, those white players you mentioned are acting on their own. Perhaps they'll be able to stay on point. But kneeling during the anthem carries too many negatives that outweigh the only positive: it gets some people's attention. For awhile, anyway.

    And the government didn't plot on MLK's life (There's also no evidence that the British gave any serious thought to murdering Gandhi either). Face it, if Uncle Sam wants you dead, you're dead, unless you just disappear, which wasn't an option for a public figure like MLK. What the government did do was spy on and try to undermine MLK in various ways, in part because the morons thought he was a communist. I mean the man's a Christian; how's he going to be a Communist, who themselves were atheists, lol.

    And you're underestimating how much White America in the North had changed by 1964, the year the Civil Rights Act was passed. Between fighting alongside African American soldiers during WW II and witnessing their valor firsthand, cheering and rooting for black baseball players who played for their favorite baseball teams (after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier), being fans of black boxing champs like Sugar Ray Robinson & Joe Louis (who famously beat Max Schmeling in their rematch, btw they later became close friends), and most significantly the desegregation of our schools in 1954 which brought white and black children together enabling them to socialize with each other en masse for the first time, all served to humanize blacks in the eyes of many whites. There was still racism up North, yes, but it was eroding, and fairly steadily. Down in the Jim Crow South, on the other hand, the KKK and Dixiecrats were still running strong. The divide between the North and South had grown over these decades, almost as if the Civil Rights movement evolved into a second Civil War of sorts.

    In 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson, who had spearheaded the passage of the Civil Rights Act , taking over for Kennedy after his assassination, was running for re-election. At the time,
    whites made up about 88% of the US population, with blacks only 10 to 11%. Clearly, black support alone wasn't going to get Johnson re-elected. And virtually all the experts, including many in his own Democratic party, believed that Johnson's support for the Civil Rights Act meant he had no hope of winning--that he had committed political suicide.

    Not only did Johnson win, but he did so by a landslide. One of the most lopsided victories in US presidential election history. Moderates may not say much very often or speak loudly when they do, but they certainly let how they vote speak volumes.
    Bottom line this is a racist country!





  3. #135
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    Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by filthflarnfilth View Post
    Bottom line this is a racist country!
    Every country has elements of racism. It's inevitable.
    Disclaimer: The content posted is of my own opinion.

    RIP #25





  4. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by wickedsolo View Post
    Every country has elements of racism. It's inevitable.
    Every country has racism, but this country was founded on equality, yet never practiced what they preached. That hypocrisy has manifested and become a gateway to unimaginable ills.





  5. #137

    Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by filthflarnfilth View Post
    Every country has racism, but this country was founded on equality, yet never practiced what they preached. That hypocrisy has manifested and become a gateway to unimaginable ills.
    Also most of the other examples are more xenophobia, where they hate you if you're foreign regardless of race.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk





  6. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by Ortizer View Post
    Also most of the other examples are more xenophobia, where they hate you if you're foreign regardless of race.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
    Exactly. There are two Americas. Most privilege folk don't understand that. They hate the word privilege but it is what it is.





  7. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by filthflarnfilth View Post
    Exactly. There are two Americas. Most privilege folk don't understand that. They hate the word privilege but it is what it is.
    Whitlock had this right it doesn't matter what the ethnicity is poverty doesn't discriminate. Lebron is privileged. Durant is privileged. Flacco is privileged. Trump is privileged.

    Real privilege lies in wealth not by the color of your skin. It's why some of us has been arguing for a long while the only way to break the cycle and for people to build generational wealth is to reward hard work again.

    You do that by attacking the entitlement system that breeds the cycle of poverty and get people in the workforce whose families have been outside for generations. There are literally families whose father has never had a steady job, mother has never had a steady job, sister never a steady job. Yet there are million of trade jobs that need to be replaced. We need to make sure Americans can earn a steady living by making, building, and maintaining things and we are not outsourcing those jobs to foreign nationals and make sure Americans can make a honest living again.





  8. #140

    Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by boller4president View Post
    Whitlock had this right it doesn't matter what the ethnicity is poverty doesn't discriminate. Lebron is privileged. Durant is privileged. Flacco is privileged. Trump is privileged.

    Real privilege lies in wealth not by the color of your skin. It's why some of us has been arguing for a long while the only way to break the cycle and for people to build generational wealth is to reward hard work again.

    You do that by attacking the entitlement system that breeds the cycle of poverty and get people in the workforce whose families have been outside for generations. There are literally families whose father has never had a steady job, mother has never had a steady job, sister never a steady job. Yet there are million of trade jobs that need to be replaced. We need to make sure Americans can earn a steady living by making, building, and maintaining things and we are not outsourcing those jobs to foreign nationals and make sure Americans can make a honest living again.
    Spot on, man.
    "A moron, a rapist, and a Pittsburgh Steeler walk into a bar. He sits down and says, Hi Im Ben may I have a drink please?
    ProFootballMock





  9. #141
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    Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by boller4president View Post
    Whitlock had this right it doesn't matter what the ethnicity is poverty doesn't discriminate. Lebron is privileged. Durant is privileged. Flacco is privileged. Trump is privileged.

    Real privilege lies in wealth not by the color of your skin. It's why some of us has been arguing for a long while the only way to break the cycle and for people to build generational wealth is to reward hard work again.

    You do that by attacking the entitlement system that breeds the cycle of poverty and get people in the workforce whose families have been outside for generations. There are literally families whose father has never had a steady job, mother has never had a steady job, sister never a steady job. Yet there are million of trade jobs that need to be replaced. We need to make sure Americans can earn a steady living by making, building, and maintaining things and we are not outsourcing those jobs to foreign nationals and make sure Americans can make a honest living again.
    Excellent post.
    Disclaimer: The content posted is of my own opinion.

    RIP #25





  10. #142

    Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by boller4president View Post
    Whitlock had this right it doesn't matter what the ethnicity is poverty doesn't discriminate. Lebron is privileged. Durant is privileged. Flacco is privileged. Trump is privileged.

    Real privilege lies in wealth not by the color of your skin. It's why some of us has been arguing for a long while the only way to break the cycle and for people to build generational wealth is to reward hard work again.

    You do that by attacking the entitlement system that breeds the cycle of poverty and get people in the workforce whose families have been outside for generations. There are literally families whose father has never had a steady job, mother has never had a steady job, sister never a steady job. Yet there are million of trade jobs that need to be replaced. We need to make sure Americans can earn a steady living by making, building, and maintaining things and we are not outsourcing those jobs to foreign nationals and make sure Americans can make a honest living again.
    Bingo!!! Privilege has nothing to do with skin color.





  11. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Privilege is fluid.
    Whether or not you have privilege depends entirely on the environment and circumstances you are in. Whether or not they are favorable, unfavorable, or neither (neutral) to you.

    You guys mentioned the wealthy, and you're right about their privilege, but there are exceptions even for the wealthy. Like when one of them strays into the wrong neighborhood and finds themselves surrounded by thieves and gang members. Under those circumstances, their wealth is no longer providing them with special favorable treatment--privilege. If anything, it's made them a target.

    Because MSM and academia have become liberal echo chambers, anyone liberal, especially any member of a protected minority group(s) has privilege. That privilege however can be rescinded for any minority who is not liberal (enough) --ex: a Black conservative or a Hispanic woman who is opposed to Radical Feminism.

    A real life example that is currently in the news is ESPN and Jemele Hill.
    ESPN wants (needs?) a black commentator who appeals to the SJW & BLM audience that they're trying to cultivate--for reasons that defy all reason, as it's driving away a much larger audience, which is bleeding ESPN to a slow death. That she's a woman, ticks off three boxes on their checklist: liberal, black and female. So, yes, when she's at work she's privileged. Arguably, the most privileged.

    And booooooyyy does she take advantage of that privileged advantage.
    Though she may be finally overplaying her privileged hand...

    However, drop Jemele somewhere in Podunk, Redneckville where there are more Confederate flags waving than American ones, and there isn't a pickup truck anywhere that doesn't have mudflaps and a gun rack, and now she no longer has that same privilege. Quite the opposite. In fact, she might find herself facing trouble that is similar to our earlier hapless, wealthy, victim with a poor sense of direction.

    Privilege is entirely dependent on environment and circumstances, and both are never constant, always changing, always fluid.

    That is why privilege is also fluid.





  12. Re: Ray Lewis talking about Kap

    Quote Originally Posted by PerpetuallyBored74 View Post
    A real life example that is currently in the news is ESPN and Jemele Hill.
    ESPN wants (needs?) a black commentator who appeals to the SJW & BLM audience that they're trying to cultivate--for reasons that defy all reason, as it's driving away a much larger audience, which is bleeding ESPN to a slow death. That she's a woman, ticks off three boxes on their checklist: liberal, black and female. So, yes, when she's at work she's privileged. Arguably, the most privileged.

    And booooooyyy does she take advantage of that privileged advantage.
    Though she may be finally overplaying her privileged hand...
    http://www.espn.com/blog/ombudsman/p...litical-tide-2

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-comments.html





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