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  1. #1
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    Defending read option (Ravens examples)



    Jason Chilton posted an article yeaterday at sbnation on the read option.
    Mentioning it here because he used 4 examples (with extremely nice wallpaper type pictures) of the Ravens alignments in the SB defending it.

    http://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2013/9/9...tion-breakdown

    Pictures are titled
    1.The Ravens bring eight into the box during the Super Bowl

    2.The Ravens blitz the slot corner (No. 24) and a linebacker to converge at the point of the handoff.

    Don't know if this link will work, sometimes have to copy and paste, but it is to the biggie of the above picture they use (link tracked through Google)
    http://cdn0.sbnation.com/imported_as..._10.51.16_.jpg

    3.The Ravens' Paul Kruger (No. 99) attacks the backfield as the "overhang" defender

    4.The 49ers run a triple option with LaMichael James and Frank Gore in the backfield.




    If you put the elements of blitz pressure, two-gapping from the DL and overhang defenders together and said, "Huh - seems like maybe a 3-4 defense is better-suited to countering the read option " then you aren't alone. Many a chalkboard type seems to think this could be true, and looking back at the 2012 season provides a very small sample size but some potentially interesting data.
    Very nice informative read for me also, I suspect more teams will consider switching to 3-4 after reading the stats.
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  2. #2

    Re: Defending read option (Ravens examples)

    I think that the read option (double option) is pretty effective in the NFL, but the triple option or traditional option has still proven to be pretty ineffective (with pitches). Defenses are too savvy and fast and the devastation of fumbling is too much to overcome. But the read option without a pitch takes away the risk of fumbling and opens up the run game.




  3. #3
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    Defending read option (Ravens examples)

    I heard a coach on Siriusnfl yesterday saying its a true 11 on 11 scenario where everyone has a specific man assignment. One guy bites and it creates problems. Kelly's offense takes it to a new level with those bizarre alignments, splitting out the tackles, 5 TEs etc
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  4. #4
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    Re: Defending read option (Ravens examples)

    remember the Dolphins a few years ago with their Wildcat offense? the Ravens stuffed it in the reg season and again in the playoffs. I remember them interviewing a defender and the comment was 'just play your area'.

    http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/...nington-ravens

    I'm guessing this zone/read is a variation of the 'cat.
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  5. #5
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    Re: Defending read option (Ravens examples)

    A disciplined defense with strong bodies up front can stop it. Which is why even last year's Ravens defense was doing fine against it until Ngata got hurt. You assign one guy to the QB. His sole mission is to attack the QB and force him to hand it off. From there, stay in your lanes and stop the run.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Defending read option (Ravens examples)

    Quote Originally Posted by sailorsam View Post
    remember the Dolphins a few years ago with their Wildcat offense? the Ravens stuffed it in the reg season and again in the playoffs. I remember them interviewing a defender and the comment was 'just play your area'.

    http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/...nington-ravens

    I'm guessing this zone/read is a variation of the 'cat.
    The difference is that in the Wildcat, you didn't have to worry too much about Ronnie Brown throwing a 20-yard out.

    The QB's who will be dangerous in this -- as Kaepernick showed Sunday -- are the ones who are first and foremost dangerous passers from the pocket. If the read-option is used as an occasional change up, it can enhance a solid offense.

    If it is used as the base offense, you are going to get your QB killed. (Exhibit A: RGIII) In the Super Bowl, Terrell Suggs was assigned to hit Kap nearly every play, whether he handed off or not. You can't subject your QB to that if you want him to see the end of the season.

    This has been the story of the NFL, every time a new running QB was going to change the way the game is played, from Cunningham to Vick to Newton. Running QB's can only have success if their running is an add-on to a solid passing game (like Steve Young, Steve McNair, and Randall Cunningham in his later years.)
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