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  1. #16
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.



    Yea, man. It is lying in very shallow waters.

    It's still hard to believe someone was that stupid putting 90 ships in one spot unless
    that's what they wanted to do to get into the war. We still won it after losing about 90
    ships - most obsolete and left over from WW1 which is maybe why they left them out.
    Forty nine were destroyed and about 40 were damaged.
    The biggest ships - the carriers were out making runs to the islands dropping planes off.
    One carrier was 225 miles from Peril when it was being bombed.
    They also made a mistake leaving the subs alone as they went after the big boys. The
    subs bit them in the ass later on.


    Back to the ARgonne Forest, the 77th Division's Commander that held the flank was
    MG Robert Alexander from Baltimore, MD. His first mission was at Wounded Knee that ended
    the great indian wars in 1890-91. That dude saw some action.

    http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/bigshow.htm
    Last edited by AirFlacco; 06-06-2013 at 06:35 PM.




  2. #17
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by NCRAVEN View Post
    Did you ever see Band of Brothers?
    I guess that is a little different in my mind because it focuses on the paratroopers and not the landing. Just as crazy though and important. It's just tougher to visualize when you are looking at the beach.
    He Who Dares.....Wins




  3. #18
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    I thought Saving Private Ryan did a good job portraying the Normandy beaches.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Forum Runner
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  4. #19
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by wickedsolo View Post
    I thought Saving Private Ryan did a good job portraying the Normandy beaches.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Forum Runner
    That was perhaps the most realistic (IMO) battle scene I've ever seen... Bc




  5. #20

    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by wickedsolo View Post
    I thought Saving Private Ryan did a good job portraying the Normandy beaches.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Forum Runner
    I have met two persons who were there that day, in fact one was at the dedication of a unit plaque at the Nat'l Memorial in Bedford I mentioned. Both of them agreed that Saving Private Ryan was a very accurate depiction of the landing. The one gentleman had been an engineer squad leader who primed several hundred pounds of TNT to destroy a concrete roadblock at Vierville sur Mer, thus opening the only road available for armor to get off the beach. His sons said he asked them to watch Private Ryan with him, and he was quite overwhelmed.

    Here's some pics of Vierville. No. 8 is where the roadblock was.
    http://www.normandie44lamemoire.com/...rvilleus2.html
    Last edited by Real Fan Dan; 06-06-2013 at 08:10 PM.
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  6. #21
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    The boys from Maryland took a heavy hit at Normandy as they went in on
    the first wave. My neighbor always had a photo of her brother in her living
    room who died that day. He was 18 and the movie Longest Day depicted young
    teenagers at Normandy. The public was horrific but it was fact.

    My dad was supposed to be there but was in an Army hospital from an earlier
    injury that probably saved his life. There was some hard fighting in North
    Africa and elsewhere before Normandy.

    The Longest Day shows how the 101st Airborne missed their drop site
    behind the lines at Normandy and were
    dropped right into the German's laps. They took over 50% casualties and
    most were dead before they hit the ground.




  7. #22

    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    I had 3 uncles who took part in the D-Day invasion...one at Normandy and two at Anzio...they did not talk about their experiences very much but you could tell it affected them for the rest of their lives. Sadly they had passed before Saving Private Ryan came out...the first 15 minutes of the movie is very disturbing and speaks highly of the men who charged up those beaches

    I visited a few WWII cemeteries in Germany when I lived there..never made it to Normandy and like many others here, it is on my list of places to visit....also visited Dachau...want to talk about a moving experience...




  8. #23
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    knots: I visited Dachau on my first trip to Europe in 1980. Amazing how you walk through the gate & the place just sucks all the color out of a bright summer day...In subsequent years I got to Buchenwald, Auschwitz-Birkenau, and Maidanek, all horrific in their own ways, but there's something about the first camp.

    FTR, I think it's appropriate to give a shout out to the outside organization that was most responsible for the success of the Normandy invasion: The Red Army. If the bulk of the Wehrmacht had not been locked in massive & mortal combat with the USSR on the Eastern Front, our guys would not have made it off the beaches.

    Say what you will about the political system they fought under--the soldiers of the old Soviet Union were tough, brave, determined & could endure just about anything, & their country ran red with their blood. We lost roughly 400,000 citizens on both fronts--the USSR lost 20 million.

    (And as for an unintentional boost to the D-Day landings, let us not forget the unnamed artillery unit whose barrage of mustard-gas shells toward the end of World War I hospitalized Gefreite Adolf Hitler. Der Fuehrer had no compunctions ordering "undesirables" gassed but owing to his experience he never sanctioned its use in battle. A good thing for the Allies, who did not even suspect the existence of the nerve agents tabun & sarin developed in Germany from 1936 on, & whose protective gear would have been utterly useless against them. A thorough soaking of the beachheads would have left them littered with thousands of Allied soldiers "doing the dying cockroach," as the mid-level Army officers I once worked with put it. And it might have left large tracts of Central Europe uninhabitable for a generation--Churchill once stated that if the Germans ever used gas, he would retaliate with mass bombings of the Reich using the anthrax spores the Brits had managed to weaponize. )




  9. #24
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    My dad was a wing commander in the 8th army air force; flew a B-17 over Normandy that day. Later he was involved in the bombing of Dresden. After the war he became a Methodist minister and, yea, he would talk about Dresden. One of his churches was Mt Vernon Place downtown.




  10. #25
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Stalingrad was the most important battle of the War and turning point of the
    war. Like mentioned above, our guys never make it to the beach because
    there would have been many more troops there although Hitler had the bulk
    of his troops in Northern France where he expected the invasion to come.

    Stalingrad was also important to the N. AFrican campaign. While Hitler's
    army was bogged down in house to house fighting there, Rommel was going
    thru Africa to get Libya's oil. MOntgomery defeated him only because he
    got more supplies and fuel in a week than Rommel got in a month because
    of Stalingrad.

    Hitler wrote that Napolean should have never invaded Russia and then he
    makes the same mistake but he could have won if he listened to his
    generals who wanted to go straight into MOscow and cut the head off first
    and then go back to Stalingrad.

    That's what U.S. did in the Iraqi war. They went straight into Bagdad
    and then went back to take the other towns after their army was cut off,
    but no Stalingrad, no victory at Normandy.

    Ike had no backup plan if Normandy failed. The Germans killed or
    maimed over 1/3 of Russia's population and they still defeated GErmany,
    thanks to Hitler's stupidity.

    Hitler was our best ally and the Allies certainly didn't want him dead when
    his own officers tried to kill him - twice.

    Check out Tom Cruise's movie - Valkyrie. Chilling, very chilling.


    http://www.imdb.com/media/rm22985472...9?ref_=tt_ov_i
    Last edited by AirFlacco; 06-07-2013 at 12:33 AM.




  11. #26
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Thank all for sharing on this most Historic Day! Visited Omaha Beach, Utah Beach, St. Mere Eglise, Pegasus Bridge and many other heroic landing sites and just simply stood in awe of what 'The Greatest Generation' sacrificed for our freedom! God Bless all of them!
    "Grab those pusillanimous sons-a-bitches by the nose and kick 'em in the balls.." General George S. Patton




  12. #27

    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by lobachevsky View Post
    knots: I visited Dachau on my first trip to Europe in 1980. Amazing how you walk through the gate & the place just sucks all the color out of a bright summer day.
    Interesting that we had exactly the same feeling. I was there in '81, and as soon as I walked through the gate, I stopped, removed the color film from my camera, and loaded a roll of black & white. It seemed to be a place where color shouldn't exist.
    I've upped my standards. Up yours.




  13. #28
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by lobachevsky View Post
    knots: I visited Dachau on my first trip to Europe in 1980. Amazing how you walk through the gate & the place just sucks all the color out of a bright summer day
    My wife and I went to Germany last summer and Dachau was our first stop.

    You hit the nail on the head. Once I saw "Arbeit macht frie" on the gates, I knew I was in for some emotions I'd never felt before.

    I could feel death all around me. Very chilling but the curators did a fantastic job with the place. Respectful and informative.
    WARNING: This post may contain material offensive to those who lack wit, humor, common sense and/or supporting factual or anecdotal evidence. All statements and assertions contained herein may be subject to literary devices not limited to: irony, metaphor, allusion and dripping sarcasm.




  14. #29

    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by lobachevsky View Post
    --the soldiers of the old Soviet Union were tough, brave, determined & could endure just about anything, & their country ran red with their blood. We lost roughly 400,000 citizens on both fronts--the USSR lost 20 million.
    Good comments Loba. A lot of Americans don't realize how many Russians died during WWII and Stalin's purges. Here is one of their main memorials to their war dead.

    http://www.war-memorial.net/Mamayev-...Memorial--1.93
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  15. #30
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    Re: OT - Remembering D-Day, 6 June 1944.

    Quote Originally Posted by moose10101 View Post
    Interesting that we had exactly the same feeling. I was there in '81, and as soon as I walked through the gate, I stopped, removed the color film from my camera, and loaded a roll of black & white. It seemed to be a place where color shouldn't exist.
    Judging from HR's response--
    Quote Originally Posted by HoustonRaven View Post
    My wife and I went to Germany last summer and Dachau was our first stop.

    You hit the nail on the head.
    --we weren't alone, & it's still true >30 years on.
    Once I saw "Arbeit macht frei" on the gates, I knew I was in for some emotions I'd never felt before.

    I could feel death all around me. Very chilling but the curators did a fantastic job with the place. Respectful and informative.
    It's even more chilling at Buchenwald or Auschwitz.

    Though IMO Auschwitz itself--a former Polish Army camp with brick barracks--is not as dramatic as Dachau. (Possibly more informative though--many of those buildings contain exhibits devoted to specific aspects of the atrocities. Not just Jews--I never understood how near the Nazis came to wiping out the Roma ["gypsies"] until I went through the barracks describing it.) You have to make the ~2 km to the Birkenau annex, with the infamous train tracks running into the camp, which blows you away with its sheer size. That's where 1,500,000 human beings were murdered.

    En route from Erfurt to Prague in 2010 I detoured to Weimar for a few hours specifically to visit Buchenwald. Jumped off the bus at the wrong spot & ended up following the route of the old train tracks for about 3 km in a heavy mist to reach the camp.

    What first blew my mind about Dachau was how close it is to Munich. From the Hauptbahnhof in the city center via the S2 S-Bahn & bus 726, roughly a half hour. I got off the bus, looked around at the charming houses of Dachau-Dorf outside the camp walls, & thought, Don't anyone try to tell me "they didn't know"!

    I was traveling back to town on the S-Bahn with 3 other Yanks, a gorgeous blond med student (broke my heart we were headed in opposite directions) & two young priests from Iowa, when a middle-aged woman got on with her elderly mother. We gave up seats for them & the daughter, who spoke some English, asked us cheerily how we were enjoying München. We allowed as how it was quite nice...& then I said, "We have just come from Dachau." A dark cloud seemed to sweep across her face & she stammered, I was very young, and I did not know--

    We don't choose our parents or our birthplaces. But it was very hard not to glance at her mother...




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